About FSC

About Food Security Cluster

Working in Partnership

The Food Security Cluster is about enhancing cooperation and partnerships. The FSC works directly with its partners and stakeholders that include international NGOs, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, UN organizations, Governments and Donors. The FSC was formally endorsed by the Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC) on the 15 December 2010.

Global Coordination for Enhanced Food Security

The Food Security Cluster (FSC) has been established in 2011 to coordinate the food security response during a humanitarian crisis, addressing issues of food availability, access and utilisation.The Cluster is based at WFP headquarters in Rome and is co-led by FAO and WFP. The Global Support Team includes FAO, WFP, NGO and Red Cross and Red Crescent members.

Operating in Emergencies and protracted crises

The Food Security Cluster (FSC) is committed to saving lives through the coordination of the food security response in major emergencies. Effective coordination is only possible through close cooperation with partner organizations. The FSC provides the guidance at the country level that supports a broad base and timely response.The FSC works with national and regional cluster systems in both sudden onset disasters, be they from natural or human causes, and long-running crises

Priority Result Areas of the global Food Security Cluster 2017-2019

For the period 2017–2019, the global Food Security Cluster is planning to achieve four strategic results through a set of focus areas of interventions and activities that are described below. Cross-cutting dimensions are mainstreamed throughout the strategy and the work plan.

Result 1: STRENGTHENED EFFECTIVENESS OF FOOD SECURITY COORDINATION SYSTEMS AT THE COUNTRY LEVEL

The focus of this result is on strengthening country-level coordination systems (formally activated clusters or cluster-like sectors) with the aim of increasing the performance of those systems against the six core coordination functions, namely to: (i) support service delivery; (ii) inform the Humanitarian Coordinator/Humanitarian Country Team’s strategic decision-making; (iii) plan and implement cluster strategies; (iv) monitor and evaluate performance; (v) build national capacity in preparedness and contingency planning; and (vi) support robust advocacy. The readiness of the global Food Security Cluster will be enhanced to deploy highly qualified and trained staff to sudden-onset emergencies and protracted crises and to provide adequate support and backstopping in a timely manner.

Result 2: ENHANCED PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVES AT THE GLOBAL LEVEL

The gFSC Strategic Plan 2015–2016 looked at opportunities and systems to strengthen country level and global partnerships in an attempt to federate more partners’ participation and foster buy-in to the cluster approach. This new result builds on gains over the past two years and explores win-win relationships with a range of actors at the global level. That relationship should be characterized by a high degree of mutual reliance and trust, where each member of the gFSC needs the other to optimize the ability to create and capture value. Furthermore, the gFSC will look beyond NGOs, donors and government actors and explore partnerships with universities and business actors, as they are likely to play a more significant role in the coming years and contribute to increase aid effectiveness. If properly managed, engaging with the private sector will offer humanitarian organizations opportunities to leverage synergies, knowhow, and resources from the business sector for the benefit of the people and communities that humanitarian organizations strive to protect and assist.

Result 3: SCALED-UP ADVOCACY, COMMUNICATION, RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND HUMANITARIAN SYSTEMS POLICY

The gFSC provides a forum at the international level to inform and support the elaboration of emergency strategies and implementation plans. Those shall integrate urgent measures to protect lives and livelihoods in parallel with forms of assistance that support local institutions dealing with longer-term needs in sustainable agriculture, natural resource management, and the provision of basic social services. Furthermore, in a context where crises are increasingly protracted, clusters tend to remain activated for much longer than envisaged at the time of the Humanitarian Reform and the Transformative Agenda. The gFSC also provides support to countries where clusters are not formally activated. Therefore, the cluster system is stretched and resources need to be proportioned if coordination is to remain effective. This result area will also look at predictability of resources for coordination, and contribute to humanitarian systems policy discussions related to coordination arrangements in protracted crises.

Result 4: FOSTERED PROGRAMMATIC APPROACH TO COORDINATION ACTION

The World Humanitarian Summit and the Grand Bargain have called for a revision of some programmatic approaches and conceptual frameworks in the humanitarian system. With some clear comparative advantages gFSC has a strong potential for becoming an agent of change at both the global and country levels, and this result therefore aims to focus on leading some of these changes, building on the diversified expertise and innovative capacities of its members.

To download the Strategic Plan, please click here

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